Contact and Coil | Nearly In Control

TAG | complexity

Aug/13

6

Where to Draw the Line(s)?

One of the most confusing things that new programmers face is how to break down their program into smaller pieces. Sometimes we call this architecture, but I’m not sure that gives the right feel to the process. Maybe it’s more like collecting insects…

Imagine you’re looking at your ladder logic program under a microscope, and you pick out two rungs of logic at random. Now ask yourself, in the collection of rungs that is your program, do these two rungs belong close together, or further apart? How do you make that decision? Obviously we don’t just put rungs that look the same next to each other, like we would if we were entomologists, but there’s clearly some measure of what belongs together, and what doesn’t.

Somehow this is related to the concept of Cohesion from computer science. Cohesion is this nebulous measure of how well the things inside of a single software “module” fit together. That, of course, makes you wonder how they defined a software module…

There are many different ways of structuring your ladder logic. One obvious restriction is order of execution. Sometimes you must execute one rung before another rung for your program to operate correctly, and that puts a one-way restriction on the location of these two rungs, but they could still be located a long way away.

Another obvious method of grouping rungs is by the physical concept of the machine. For instance, all the rungs for starting and stopping a motor, detecting a fault with that motor (failure to start), and summarizing the condition of that motor are typically together in one module (or file/program/function block/whatever).

Still we sometimes break that rule. We might, for instance, have the motor-failed-to-start-fault in the motor program, but likely want to map this fault to an alarm on the HMI, and that alarm will be driven in some rung under the HMI alarms program, potentially a long way away from the motor program. Why did we draw the line there? Why not put the alarm definition right beside the fault definition that drives it? In most cases it’s because the alarms, by necessity, are addressed by a number (or a bit position in a bit array) and we have to make sure we don’t double-allocate an alarm number. That’s why we put all the alarms in one file in numerical order, so we can see which numbers we’ve already used, and also so that when alarm # 153 comes up on the HMI, we can quickly find that alarm bit in the PLC by scrolling down to rung 153 (if we planned it right) in that alarms program.

I just want to point out that this is only a restriction of the HMI (and communication) technology. We group alarms into bit arrays for faster communication, but with PC-based control systems we’re nearing the day when we can just configure alarms without a numbering scheme. If you could configure your HMI software to alarm when any given tag in the PLC turned on, you wouldn’t even need an alarms file, let alone the necessity of separating the alarms from the fault logic.

Within a program, how should we order our rungs? Assuming you satisfied the execution order requirement I talked about above, I usually fall back on three rules of thumb: (1) tell a story, (2) keep things that change together grouped together, and (3) separate the “why” from the “how”.

What I mean by “tell a story” is that the rungs should be organized into a coherent thought process. The reader should be able to understand what you were thinking. First we calculate the whozit #1, then the whozit #2, then the whozit #3, and then we average the 3. That’s better than mixing the summing/averaging with the calculating of individual whozits.

Point #2 (keep things that change together grouped together) is a pragmatic rule. In general it would be nice if your code was structured in a way that you only had to make changes in one place, but as we know, that’s not always the case. If you do have a situation where changing one piece of logic means you likely have to change another piece of logic, consider putting those two rungs together, as close as you can manage.

Finally, “separate the why from the how”. Sometimes the “how” is as simple as turning on an output, and in that case this rule doesn’t apply, but sometimes you run across complicated logic just to, say, send a message to another controller, or search for something in an array based on a loop (yikes). In that case, try to remove the complexity of the “how” away from the upper level flow of the “why”. Don’t interrupt the story with gory details, just put that into an appendix. Either stuff that “how” code in the bottom of the same program, or, better yet, move it into its own program or function block.

None of these are hard and fast rules, but they are generally accepted ways of managing the complexity of your program. You have to draw those lines somewhere, so give a little thought to it at first, and save your reader a boatload of confusion.

·

Apr/12

18

On Managing Complexity

There’s a recurring theme on this blog when I talk about programming. It’s a skill you don’t learn in school, but which separates recent graduates from employees with 5 years of experience: how to manage complexity.

The reason you never learned how to manage complexity in nearly 20 years of school is that you never actually encountered anything of sufficient complexity that it needed managing. That’s because at the beginning of each term/semester/year you start with a blank slate. If you only ever spend up to 500 hours on a school project, you’ll never understand what it feels like to look at a system with 10,000 engineering hours logged to it.

That’s when the rules of the game change. You’ve only ever had to deal with projects where you could hold all the parts and variables in your head at one time and make sense of it. Once a project grows beyond the capability of one person to simultaneously understand every part of it, everything starts to unravel. When you change A you’ll forget that you had to change B too. Suddenly your productivity and quality start to take a nosedive. You’ve reached a tipping point, and there’s no going back.

It isn’t until you reach that point that you understand why interfaces are useful and why global variables are bad (not to mention their object-oriented cousins, the singleton).

The funny thing is that you learn about all the tools for managing complexity in school. When I was in high school I was taught about structured programming and introduced to modular programming. In university my first programming class used C++ and went through all the features like classes, inheritance and polymorphism. However, since we’d never seen a system big enough to need these tools, most of it fell on deaf ears. Now that I think about it, I wonder if our professors had ever worked on a system big enough to need those tools.

The rules of managing complexity are:

  • Remove unnecessary dependencies between parts of your system. Do this by designing each module against an abstract interface that only includes the functionality it needs, nothing else.
  • Make necessary dependencies explicit. If one module depends on another, state it explicitly, preferably in a way that can be verified for correctness by an automated checker (compiler, etc.). In object-oriented programming this is typically done with constructor injection.
  • Be consistent. Humans are pattern-recognition machines. Guide your reader’s expectations by doing similar things the same way everywhere. (Five-rung logic, anyone?)
  • Automate! Don’t make a person remember any more than they have to. Are there 3 steps to make some change? Can we make it 2, or better yet, 1?

It would be interesting if, in university, your second year project built on your first year project, and your third year project built on your second year project, etc. Maybe by your fourth year you’d have a better appreciation for managing complexity.

·

Theme Design by devolux.nh2.me